Our Gifts

Our Gifts

nautilus shell
Photo by premasagar

Each of us has gifts to offer the world. It may take life experiences to recognize them and experimentation to discover how the world wants them expressed.

You can also do exercises to help surface them.

They may be un-obvious to us because they’ve always been there or have never been brought forward. We may also have learned to repress them when young.

Some of us are early bloomers, clear on what we can offer early on. Others are late bloomers, needing to work through some life experiences before they surface. And others are somewhere in between.

Some years ago, I saw the TED talk by “Eat, Pray, Love” author Elizabeth Gilbert. She had an excellent insight into the impossible things we expect of gifts, using the example of artists and geniuses. She shares that, instead of “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius.

When we recognize we have gifts rather than are them, we can better recognize our role as vehicles of expression. It’s not about who we are or something we control. It’s how we can be open to the flows of time. No need to play the “suffering artist.”

Gilbert also explores the origin of the word genius and the muse.
Davidya

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8 Comments

  1. Guru

    Hello, This is excellent. world need not recognize our talents. it may remain hidden. what a difference. you are a talent and you have talent. These discussions can save us from taking birth again! Thanks for sharing this.

    1. Hi Guru
      Generally, our talents are about how we can support the world, to do our part, our dharma. But you’re right. That may not be something overt. Our work may be hidden from the world. Most of the awake i know, for example, are not teachers or talking about it in public They just live it.

      The key though is we have gifts, they’re not who we are. Others may define us by them, like seeing me as “the writer” for example. But the writing is just the way I share what is unfolding. It is not who I am. It was not present for much of my life.

  2. George Robinson

    Then, too, there’s the problem of what to do when what your gift is, is something you don’t like to do. I’m a sixth generation school teacher, and teaching in one form or another is a “gift.” However, I truly — how to say it mildly? — do NOT like teaching others. I even tried to escape my lineage by serving in an entirely different career when first starting out, but after I retired from that, the old genetics came out of the shadows and the next thing I knew, I was a teacher/administrator in public schools. So, the question arises, how can you put something to bed so that it doesn’t resurface again? Well, anyway, thanks, D. I genuinely do not know what I’d do without you or Lorn to turn to.

    1. Hi George
      Actually, that would be karma. I had a similar experience with police work. Like the Beatles song, I left the police dept but ended up back there again until that karma competed. It came with a bunch of secondary craziness as well. (We used to talk about writing a book about that stuff.) Often, we take birth in a family that will mutually support working stuff out. For me, that showed up more around education, as I’ve written about. They failed to influence my career (but sure tried (laughs)).

      The usual way to “put it to bed” is to finish acting out the karma. Some will also explore energy healing or tools like jyotish or nadi to find the driver of the karma and help resolve it more directly.

      There is lots of routine karma that comes and goes but a few things will be major life themes that are more entangled. Those take more work…

  3. Absolutely one of my favorite parts of doing the astrological and intuitive work is putting light on people’s gifts- so joyful and satisfying to watch the subtle tumblers all line up in someone in real time as they tune into their own music.

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