Action Required

Reading further in Conversations with Maharishi, Volume 2, a key point is raised. Maharishi notes that vigorous activity strengthens silence. He observes that when we use multiple senses simultaneously, it requires a centre of silence. This is very evolutionary.

But activity also adds stress which reduces clarity. Thus, we end up moving at an “ant’s” speed. But it still means that simply living life well is very evolutionary and will eventually lead to spiritual awakening.

If we add effortless meditation to the equation, then we reduce stress and increase the connection to silence. This considerably speeds up the process. But it is speeding up the natural process already taking place. It is not the meditation doing it but rather assisting it.

The key is silence and activity both. Not just all activity. But neither retiring to a dark cave. A cave may allow us to go deep into silence but this will typically not make it strong but instead ungrounded and flaky. Then our activity is poor. So any retreat time should be grounded with lots of active time. If it doesn’t hold up to activity, then more activity is needed, more grounding.

Life in the world is not an enemy of spiritual growth. It is spiritual growth.

Learning to be in the world well can be a bit of process. Learning to be OK with what is, yet change what can be changed. Learning to live well but not in excess – finding the happy medium. Learning to give in healthy ways. Learning not to resist what arises but instead find a way to process it through and away. Learning what you feed with your attention grows, so choose what gets your attention well. Learning to find what you need within. Learning who you are, under all the thoughts and feelings.

Life can be a wonderful school if we’re open to the lessons.
Davidya

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6 Responses to Action Required

  1. My favorite sentence is clearly “Life in the world is not an enemy of spiritual growth. It is spiritual growth.”

    Sooooo important.

  2. Davidya says:

    Thanks, Rose.
    One of the lessons my mothers death brought home was just how much spiritual growth we can make, just living our lives and helping others how we can.

  3. Eddie says:

    So all my dancing and golf has been very beneficial to my unfoldment :). And indeed there has been ‘movement’. Significant purging – open and willing!

  4. Davidya says:

    Hi Eddie!
    Yeah, more than you know. One of the funny things about experiencing through this little body-mind is we loose a big hunk of the context. But it allows us to see the individual lessons and learn them much more directly.

    A lot of our progress comes quietly, in the background of the story of our lives. But there are points on the journey, like spiritual awakening, when we cross a huge threshold. While the clearing will continue, it’s happening on a whole ‘nother level and dramatically accelerates the process.

    As Lorne has commented, that open and willing becomes perpetual, allowing a deep merging with all that is. 😉

  5. Kylie Sparks says:

    Beautiful post, David. I have often noticed how meditation/spiritual activities go much better after a vigorous walk. I remember that it used to baffle me how a 3 day weekend alone, instead of recharging me, seemed to be really bad for me. Like you say: “A cave may allow us to go deep into silence but this will typically not make it strong but instead ungrounded and flaky” I realized it is more restful for me if my day is balanced with activity and alone time. But also, as my connection to the silence has grown, my activities in the world have increased so much.

  6. Davidya says:

    Hi Kylie
    Yes, it’s a balance to seek. A balance that varies by person and by time of life. I’ve found I do my best work solo but if I work too much, my life goes out of balance. I gradually learned to culture an active social life for balance. I also thrive on short retreats, but they’re not solo nor typically silent. Just more inner directed with a potent group that is mostly awake.

    My work has become progressively more sedentary, so now I’m working to balance that too.

    Another aspect that relates to this is temperament. Myers Briggs speaks of Introvert/ Extrovert. But this is actually more about where we get our energy from. We can be inner directed but be an MB extrovert – we’re lifted by being around others. And vice versa, we may need down-time after social events. The trick again is balance. And people tend to moderate their MB scores with age.

    Thanks for the comment. It’s an important point.

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